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April 3 - April 24, 2019
Alizander Lizaso's avatar

Alizander Lizaso

SUNY New Paltz

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 447 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    2.0
    conversations
    with people
  • up to
    360
    minutes
    spent learning

Alizander's Actions

Transport

Use Muscle Power

#49 Cars

I will cut my car trip mileage by only taking necessary trips, and I will only use muscle-powered transportation for all other trips.

COMPLETED 2
DAILY ACTIONS

Transport

Research and Advocate for High-Speed Rail

#66 High-Speed Rail

I will spend at least 60 minutes researching and advocating for a comprehensive high speed rail network in my country/region.

Completed
One-Time Action

Transport

Research and Consider Switching to a Hybrid or Electric Vehicle

#26 Electric Vehicles

I will spend at least 60 minutes researching and weighing my options to see if a hybrid or electric vehicle makes sense for my lifestyle.

Completed
One-Time Action

Electricity Generation

Spread the Word about Energy Alternatives

All Electricity Generation Solutions

I will research and tell 2 people each day about the benefits of alternative energy sources like wind turbines, solar energy, geothermal energy, and methane digesters.

COMPLETED 1
DAILY ACTION

Electricity Generation

Learn More About Geothermal Energy

#18 Geothermal

I will spend at least 60 minutes learning more about the energy generation potential of geothermal energy and consider investing in this technology.

Completed
One-Time Action

Electricity Generation

Learn More about Wave and Tidal Energy

#29 Wave and Tidal

I will spend at least 60 minutes learning more about the energy generation potential of wave and tidal energy.

Completed
One-Time Action

Food

Keep Track of Wasted Food

#3 Reduced Food Waste

I will keep a daily log of food I throw away during the EcoChallenge, either because it went bad before I ate it, I put too much on my plate, or it was scraps from food preparation.

COMPLETED 7
DAILY ACTIONS

Electricity Generation

Learn More about Micro Wind

#76 Micro Wind

I will spend at least 60 minutes learning more about the energy generation potential of Micro Wind.

Completed
One-Time Action

Electricity Generation

Learn More about Biomass

#34 Biomass

I will spend at least 60 minutes learning more about the energy generation potential of biomass.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed

  • Reflection Question
    Transport Research and Advocate for High-Speed Rail
    What are the factors that influence your choice of transportation? These can include things like money, time, and convenience, as well as perceptions of danger or safety. What would need to change for you to regularly choose more climate-friendly options?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/23/2019 8:44 PM
    The lack of efficient public transportation in America, specifically high-speed rail systems, is an issue I struggled to understand for several years. After seeing online high-speed rail systems in other countries such as China, Japan, and most European countries such as Spain and France, I began to question why the United States still does not have one. YouTube channel Wendover Productions and Business Insider also did videos on this topic as well. The Untied States' fastest high speed train is the Acela Express which runs from Boston, Massachusetts to Washington D.C. It averages around 80-90 miles per hour with a total distance of about 400 miles. It takes about 7 hours to travel from Boston to Washington D.C. by Acela Express and costs no less than 150-200 USD. For comparison, high-speed rail from Guangzhou to Changsha in China, covering almost the same distance, takes around 2 and a half to 3 hours for a fraction of the cost of the Acela. Japan's Shinkansen railway lines in Japan have yet to record a single casualty in its over 50 years of operation. America's Amtrak was formed in 1971, and has since seen several derailments, resulting in several deaths and injuries. In Glenn Luk's Forbes article, I sympathize with him when he thinks about how much money we spent on the Iraq war, and how much of that money could have been used for other things such as high speed rail systems. Military spending accounts for more than 50 percent of our annual spending each year while only a fraction of our budget is spent on building infrastructure. A high-speed rail system could provide transportation of food, supplies, and passengers much more efficiently than current rail systems such as Amtrak, which do not even reach max speeds of 80 miles per hour and still see countless derailments. So why not allocate the money an resources towards building the infrastructure needed for high-speed rail? In his article Luk mentions the 'suburban sprawl' and culture as partially responsible for the lack of high speed rail systems in the U.S. I agree with this because outside most cities are suburbs which are spread out across a further distance than some land of other major cities. Also, American culture embraces the automobile and has for decades. However, I believe a major reason why is the lack of funding as well as property rights. Ownership of land and being able to improve existing rail lines to make them high-speed rail efficient would require a big budget, and would most likely be stopped by state legislators and suburban residents who are against it. With lack of support and demand from U.S. residents, especially those located in more rural or suburban areas, I do not believe a high speed rail system will be able to grow in the United States. 
  • Reflection Question
    Food Keep Track of Wasted Food
    An average American throws out about 240 lbs of food per year. The average family of four spends $1,500 a year on food that they throw out. Where would you rather use this money?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/18/2019 11:40 AM
    Monday, April 15. I did not waste food because I had the same amount of food I usually eat everyday. My breakfast was small, a bowl of cereal with greek yogurt. Then I had a chicken sandwich for lunch and pasta for dinner. When I am here at school, I usually do not eat as frequently or as much as I do when I am home. Therefore, food waste is normally minimal. I only buy food when I need something and just the right amount. Since I have limited funds and am currently unemployed, I tend not to get groceries as often since I cannot afford to. The necessary food I do buy I make sure to finish. 

    • Alizander Lizaso's avatar
      Alizander Lizaso 4/18/2019 11:46 AM
      The above can apply to all of the days I spend here at New Paltz. I believe it comes down to what I can and cannot afford. If I was working and could afford to buy more types of food, my diet and meals may change and lead to more food waste. Therefore, not being able to afford certain food in a way is more beneficial for me because it prevents me from unnecessarily buying food and potentially increasing my food waste output. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Wave and Tidal Energy
    What did you learn about wave and tidal energy? Were you surprised by the information you found?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:56 PM
    There are many aspects of tidal and wave enegy that I did not consider when thinking about forms of clean energy. Firstly, I believe I am a perfect example of why being educated about renewable sources of energy is important for future generations to udmerstand what should be done now for the coming years. I initially considered wave and tidal energy as essentially the same and lumped them together into on potential source of clean energy. However, I was suprised and embarrassed to learn how wrong I was and how different they are. I never realized wave energy would be harnessed through bouys and floats at the surface as opposed to beneath it. Tide energy would be harnessed beneath the surface and is predictable centuries in advance as it draws its energy from the location of the moon and earth. I was also shocked by how much potential energy output the U.S. recieves along its shores each year, 2100 terrawatt hours. The numbers are most likely different today compared to 2007 when these numbers were presented, but I am curious to know if we were able to tap into at least a quarter of this potential output energy. My guess would be that we  have not yet. Although tidal and wave energy would be immensely beneficial for the planet as well as a cleaner form of generating electricity, I do not believe it will gain traction or commercial success wothin the bext 50 years at least. Drawdown.org predicts implementation of tidal and wave technologies would result in at least $1 trillion in net losses and operational costs, more than double what we would save. With little incentive for companies to invest, I do not believe they are forms of energy that will gain traction anytime soon unfortunately. The real challenge for us would be to figure out a way to convince firms, public officials, and those of high authority to fight for stronger implementation of these technologies. I believe investment will come only when potential energy outputs and potential profits from tidal and wave energy is realized by big businesses. Being as it is the most expensive form of renewable energy, it will require a lot of incentive for businesses to invest. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Wave and Tidal Energy
    What did you learn about wave and tidal energy? Were you surprised by the information you found?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:56 PM
    There are many aspects of tidal and wave enegy that I did not consider when thinking about forms of clean energy. Firstly, I believe I am a perfect example of why being educated about renewable sources of energy is important for future generations to udmerstand what should be done now for the coming years. I initially considered wave and tidal energy as essentially the same and lumped them together into on potential source of clean energy. However, I was suprised and embarrassed to learn how wrong I was and how different they are. I never realized wave energy would be harnessed through bouys and floats at the surface as opposed to beneath it. Tide energy would be harnessed beneath the surface and is predictable centuries in advance as it draws its energy from the location of the moon and earth. I was also shocked by how much potential energy output the U.S. recieves along its shores each year, 2100 terrawatt hours. The numbers are most likely different today compared to 2007 when these numbers were presented, but I am curious to know if we were able to tap into at least a quarter of this potential output energy. My guess would be that we  have not yet. Although tidal and wave energy would be immensely beneficial for the planet as well as a cleaner form of generating electricity, I do not believe it will gain traction or commercial success wothin the bext 50 years at least. Drawdown.org predicts implementation of tidal and wave technologies would result in at least $1 trillion in net losses and operational costs, more than double what we would save. With little incentive for companies to invest, I do not believe they are forms of energy that will gain traction anytime soon unfortunately. The real challenge for us would be to figure out a way to convince firms, public officials, and those of high authority to fight for stronger implementation of these technologies. I believe investment will come only when potential energy outputs and potential profits from tidal and wave energy is realized by big businesses. Being as it is the most expensive form of renewable energy, it will require a lot of incentive for businesses to invest. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Wave and Tidal Energy
    What did you learn about wave and tidal energy? Were you surprised by the information you found?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:56 PM
    There are many aspects of tidal and wave enegy that I did not consider when thinking about forms of clean energy. Firstly, I believe I am a perfect example of why being educated about renewable sources of energy is important for future generations to udmerstand what should be done now for the coming years. I initially considered wave and tidal energy as essentially the same and lumped them together into on potential source of clean energy. However, I was suprised and embarrassed to learn how wrong I was and how different they are. I never realized wave energy would be harnessed through bouys and floats at the surface as opposed to beneath it. Tide energy would be harnessed beneath the surface and is predictable centuries in advance as it draws its energy from the location of the moon and earth. I was also shocked by how much potential energy output the U.S. recieves along its shores each year, 2100 terrawatt hours. The numbers are most likely different today compared to 2007 when these numbers were presented, but I am curious to know if we were able to tap into at least a quarter of this potential output energy. My guess would be that we  have not yet. Although tidal and wave energy would be immensely beneficial for the planet as well as a cleaner form of generating electricity, I do not believe it will gain traction or commercial success wothin the bext 50 years at least. Drawdown.org predicts implementation of tidal and wave technologies would result in at least $1 trillion in net losses and operational costs, more than double what we would save. With little incentive for companies to invest, I do not believe they are forms of energy that will gain traction anytime soon unfortunately. The real challenge for us would be to figure out a way to convince firms, public officials, and those of high authority to fight for stronger implementation of these technologies. I believe investment will come only when potential energy outputs and potential profits from tidal and wave energy is realized by big businesses. Being as it is the most expensive form of renewable energy, it will require a lot of incentive for businesses to invest. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Wave and Tidal Energy
    What did you learn about wave and tidal energy? Were you surprised by the information you found?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:56 PM
    There are many aspects of tidal and wave enegy that I did not consider when thinking about forms of clean energy. Firstly, I believe I am a perfect example of why being educated about renewable sources of energy is important for future generations to udmerstand what should be done now for the coming years. I initially considered wave and tidal energy as essentially the same and lumped them together into on potential source of clean energy. However, I was suprised and embarrassed to learn how wrong I was and how different they are. I never realized wave energy would be harnessed through bouys and floats at the surface as opposed to beneath it. Tide energy would be harnessed beneath the surface and is predictable centuries in advance as it draws its energy from the location of the moon and earth. I was also shocked by how much potential energy output the U.S. recieves along its shores each year, 2100 terrawatt hours. The numbers are most likely different today compared to 2007 when these numbers were presented, but I am curious to know if we were able to tap into at least a quarter of this potential output energy. My guess would be that we  have not yet. Although tidal and wave energy would be immensely beneficial for the planet as well as a cleaner form of generating electricity, I do not believe it will gain traction or commercial success wothin the bext 50 years at least. Drawdown.org predicts implementation of tidal and wave technologies would result in at least $1 trillion in net losses and operational costs, more than double what we would save. With little incentive for companies to invest, I do not believe they are forms of energy that will gain traction anytime soon unfortunately. The real challenge for us would be to figure out a way to convince firms, public officials, and those of high authority to fight for stronger implementation of these technologies. I believe investment will come only when potential energy outputs and potential profits from tidal and wave energy is realized by big businesses. Being as it is the most expensive form of renewable energy, it will require a lot of incentive for businesses to invest. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Biomass
    Had you ever heard of biomass techonology before you took this challenge? What did you learn that surprised you? Share this with your friends!

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:10 PM
    I was always aware of biomass as being an alternative source of energy to fossil fuels, but never fully understood what it was or how it was utilized to harness energy. I assumed most agricultural waste and crops would be suitable sources of biomass energy. However, upon learning more from these sources, annual crops such as corn, which is grown in abundance here in the U.S., would not be suitable for sources of biomass energy. I was not aware that only certain sustainably grown crops and waste from mills would be viable options to use as sources of energy. I was also unaware of the fact biomass energy is only a means to an end and not a final solution for clean energy. It is important to have “bridge” solutions such as this because it helps us gradually move our efforts toward complete clean energy and renewable resources. Learning what will help get us to our end goal and what is considered clean energy is crucial, especially to students like me, who represent the future generation and will have to live with these decisions. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Biomass
    Had you ever heard of biomass techonology before you took this challenge? What did you learn that surprised you? Share this with your friends!

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/17/2019 8:10 PM
    I was always aware of biomass as being an alternative source of energy to fossil fuels, but never fully understood what it was or how it was utilized to harness energy. I assumed most agricultural waste and crops would be suitable sources of biomass energy. However, upon learning more from these sources, annual crops such as corn, which is grown in abundance here in the U.S., would not be suitable for sources of biomass energy. I was not aware that only certain sustainably grown crops and waste from mills would be viable options to use as sources of energy. I was also unaware of the fact biomass energy is only a means to an end and not a final solution for clean energy. It is important to have “bridge” solutions such as this because it helps us gradually move our efforts toward complete clean energy and renewable resources. Learning what will help get us to our end goal and what is considered clean energy is crucial, especially to students like me, who represent the future generation and will have to live with these decisions. 
  • Reflection Question
    Electricity Generation Learn More about Micro Wind
    Micro turbines can be placed on large structures to take advantage of stronger, steadier breezes. The Eiffel Tower now sports vertical axis turbines that produce electricity for use on site. Where could micro turbines potentially be installed in your city?

    Alizander Lizaso's avatar
    Alizander Lizaso 4/04/2019 7:36 AM
    I believe microturbines can be installed at multiple locations on long island. Especially the south shore. Being from the north shore of long island, I believe Microturbines would be of most use at more open, higher elevation areas. The shouth shore however would greatly benefit from the strong ocean breezes they experience there. From many of my visits there, I always felt strong breezes in towns near the southern shore. We should take advantage of their location close to the sea and utilize the potential energy which can be created there.